62 Comments
Jan 29, 2023Liked by Rachel Botsman

Hey Rachel, I am a big fan of your work on trust. Every night when we put our two sons to bed, seven and four, we all say “we are honest, able, reliable, and helpful. I love you, trust you, and like you.” It’s our family’s guiding light and your 4 pillars of trust has guided us there. We use it as a measuring stick for conversation and course correction for not only our kids but for my wife and I! Thank you:)

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I love that Clay! Telling kids you trust them is so powerful.

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Aug 14, 2023·edited Aug 14, 2023Liked by Rachel Botsman

Hi Rachel (and the Rethink Community!) Thank you for your compelling work. I'm a recovering tv news reporter turned author & facilitator based in Sydney. Like many fellow Rethinkers, I was first struck by your work when watching 2012 TED Talk on the Trust Economy. I'm particularly interested in how we establish & accelerate trust in teams, to get important work done - particularly as we continue to negotiate new ways of working. You have prompted me to examine how trust is formed between strangers (often instantly) in the context of a high-performance news crew on assignment - and how that framework can be translated into the corporate arena to newly distributed teams. Thank you for creating this community! Andrea

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May 17, 2023Liked by Rachel Botsman

I meant to finish off saying most importantly I’m happy, in a good place mentally and long may it last.

Thanks for sharing your writing - much appreciated.

Regards Alan Wardle

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May 17, 2023Liked by Rachel Botsman

Thanks Rachel - I came across you by chance on LinkedIn and was just curious to read some of your stuff.

I’m a UK 63 year old retired guy who has bipolar disorder and unfortunately suffers with bad osteoarthritis which is somewhat physically limiting. However I still go to the gym (I know it’s really beneficial to my mental health) two or three times a week and like to get on my bike when the sun is shining. Most importantly I’m in a good place mentally and

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May 13, 2023Liked by Rachel Botsman

Hi Rachel, was introduced to your writing on LinkedIn. I am a trailing edge boomer, husband, father, bean counter, Kentuckian, cardio enthusiast, and sustainability neophyte. As a public sector auditor for over forty years a lot of resources are expended to create trust where it is lacking. Might be overlooking this on the website somehow, but could you share your reply to Shane's question below? Keep up the good work!

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I plan to write a post on Shane’s questions. Stay tuned...

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Spatial apathy sounds like Manuel from Fawlty Towers. Rachelisms are okay. You say enough things that are spot on.

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Jan 30, 2023Liked by Rachel Botsman

Hi Rachel, I'm in the tech industry and located in Brisbane, Australia. I discovered your work a couple of years ago through the Oxford Executive Leadership Programme and Rupert Younger's book The Reputation Game. I'm especially interested in the relationship between trust and productivity. Thanks for all your great work!

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Interesting. What questions do you have about the relationship between trust and productivity?

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Two main question areas:

1. Most recently I've been working for external vendors selling/delivering solutions to customers and I've found building trust is key to more productive working relationships with customers. So, the types of questions are around how to build trust more effectively? and how to accelerate that building of trust so we can get to the higher performing stage faster?

2. When working within an organisation, how can you build trust within and across teams to make completion of work easier [improve efficiency by reducing friction], and enhance collaboration and learning [improve effectiveness]? In my experience, there is so much wasted time/effort/money due to lack of trust between teams (as well as misalignment between teams - I'm also a fan of Dr Trevor's work).

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Jan 29, 2023Liked by Rachel Botsman

Hello, my name is Louis.. I have been following your work on LinkedIn for a few months prior to you moving to SubStack. I enjoy your writing enough that I followed you to SubStack only to continue reading your material! (Now isn't that an ego boost!)

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Thanks! If there are topics you'd like me to dig into, do let me know.

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Thanks so much.

Rachel how are you?

& what do you do.?.

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Hello all,

I'm Jeffrey O'Brien, an architect and project construction manager in Washington, D C. Born and raised in the Midwest United States, I love racing out to the fields west of town and watch as giant thunderstorms roll in from the west. My wife is a nanny, my son is a budding photographer and our dogs Belle and Dakota are a wonderful pair. I enjoy Rachel's insights greatly. No other content provider strikes the chords which ring in my experience as much as she does. I do long to become a content provider on the theme of perception and the physical and psychological experience of our world. Having lived and travelled in the Middle East and Europe, being filled with many rich diverse cultures, i hope to share some of those stories and life experiences to enhance the dialogue with our varied and interesting peoples, while being brief, ha!

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Lovely to 'meet' you Jeffrey. I too love watching thunderstorms roll through the Oxfordshire countryside. I look forward to reading your comments and questions.

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Hey Rachel, Karen from New Zealand here. I’ve followed you for quite a while having first attended a conference in 2014 or 2015 hosted by Cognizant in Auckland where you spoke along with Ben Pring. It is a regret of mine that I didn’t get the chance to meet you at dinner that evening as I was unwell.

Having followed a fairly traditional career for more than 25 years, my life has changed fundamentally in the last year - precipitated by a cancer diagnosis. Ultimately, I left my marriage of 35 years and the ‘secure’ job as CEO and part owner of a mid sized management consultancy. These experiences have got me thinking and rethinking about trust and the impacts of betrayal.

I’m now funding a startup business where trust is the cornerstone on which our team operates. I look forward to reading your newsletters. (And I love your sketches 😀)

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Mindfulness, vegan cooking, musician tattooer, hmmmmm I love kettlebells and Ashtanga, I’m working on my straddle handstand and figuring out how to be than do. Day by day, thought per thought.

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Rachel, I'm just feeling my way on substack. I'm the author of The Purple Presidency 2024 from Real Clear and previously, The Evolution of Progress from Random House, 1993. I'm not looking for a revenue stream here, only another avenue for spreading the ideas in my book(s) and eliciting an interchange in ideas. If you happen to know any quality sites along those lines that might give me ideas for a useful approach, I would welcome your guidance. Best, Owen Paepke

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Jun 20, 2023Liked by Rachel Botsman

Since reading Bruce Schneiers "Liars and Outliers" I've had an interest in what trust means to civil society. I'm new to your work - was intrigued by a reference to your work in a Substack feature today, so I'm interested to find out what you have to say!

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Jun 10, 2023Liked by Rachel Botsman

Wow, just saw people really post. And the most amazing: Rachel is actually answering :) Appreciate that, happy to connect. A short interview:

Who are you?

I'm Christof, from Frankfurt, Germany.

What do you do?

I had a career in Private Banking and Institutional Quantitative Asset Management. But jumped ship a few years back because I suddenly found - well - life is limited. And I just did not want to do that all the way through.

It gets clearer and clearer that my new endeavor is to show, teach and motivate non-finance people how to invest better themselves, gain confidence and, well, trust. I try that with a website where I aim to deliver deep, high-quality content but somewhat unconventionally packed and in approachable form (Hence the name Papa und Paul. No link. You will have to find yourself).

Do you consider yourself a thought leader?

With high certainty: no.

But being able now to choose a little more what I spend my time on, I discover there is a difference between 'learning a topic' and 'thinking about a topic' - and what can emerge once you just start taking your own thoughts and ideas a little more serious.

Why are you here, then?

Two main reasons. Firstly, I just like Rachel's content, and I can connect to the thought processes she offers and her ability to ask good questions. That resonates with me, I am thankful for that. It's a little missing in our current world. Also, the natural, unpretentious, 'common-sense way' of her writing and presenting. Really like that – an inspiration to learn from for my own endeavors.

Second: She wrote somewhere something like 'when you sign up I give you practical tips on my process for developing ideas, preparing for talks etc.' Yeah, I admit that sounded interesting :). Happy to connect with you all :)

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Welcome to the Rethink community Christof! Thanks for the wonderful feedback on the questions and ideas I share. I’d love any feedback on the types of practical tips that would be helpful to share. I work across so many mediums - books, podcasts, speeches, teaching - so looking to the community to share what they want! Thanks Rachel

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Jun 1, 2023Liked by Rachel Botsman

Hi Rachel (and everyone!) I was aware of you from linked in but lucky enough to hear you speak at a work conference and your talk on trust in a work context really got my brain cells going. I’m a lawyer in industry and spend a lot of my time trying to build good working relationships with people inside and outside my organisation, around the world (I’m in the UK) and I see trust as a key element in creating effective and fulfilling connections. Always curious about how people are happy to sit in a box and not engage with the diversity and opportunity available to them!

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Nicola! A belated welcome to Rethink. Out of interest, what was the conference? I've always been curious about the 'sitting in a box' mindset. I guess it's comfortable and feels secure for some people. I've never been good at it myself :)

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Aug 3, 2023Liked by Rachel Botsman

It was last year’s Shell Deal Week. And if you put me in a box I am immediately looking for a way out…!

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Feb 27, 2023Liked by Rachel Botsman

Hi Rachel! I became interested in your work after watching your TED talks earlier in my career. I work in the Canadian Credit Union system rurally in Marketing, with recently moving to a Change Leadership role. I am looking forward to leveraging your ideas on collaboration and trust in my new role and seeing how they help achieve success for my small credit union and our adaptation to our evolving work.

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Jan 30, 2023Liked by Rachel Botsman

Hi Rachel,

I have always enjoyed your common sense attitude (very little of that going around these days). And I'm able to relate to many of your topics both personally and professionally (semi retired).

Thanks,

KCA

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Lovely to hear. Thanks KC.

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Jan 29, 2023Liked by Rachel Botsman

Your Ted talk in 2012 inspired me to look at trust economies and how new tech facilitates same. As a retired detective I have been more concerned with how easy trust can be destroyed by bullies and narcissistic abusers who often use hidden psychological tactics to harm and cause loss to others. 🕵️‍♂️. As governments seek to be the sole arbiters of who is trusted and who is not to engage in commerce and transport - over regulation of these new innovations by governments has the potential to destroy them and drag us all back into the dark ages. Uber is a case in point here in NZ. 👀

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Thanks Rachel. Send me an email and I’ll send you a free book. We need to educate people as to how to spot psychological abuse and protect themselves from it. Gas lighting is insidious. We can not build trust economies if it’s presently so easy for an abuser to run to the police and courts when caught and engage in DARVO and have the good people who caught them locked up and terrorised. That is our family story. Abuses of power and incompetence harms good people.

https://www.reputationguardian.nz 🕵️‍♂️

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Jan 29, 2023Liked by Rachel Botsman

Hey Rachel! Love what you're doing with the place. I learned about you while googling for great books on trust. Yours popped up! I signed up for your list and have been learning more since. My name is Neil Pasricha and I'm a Toronto-based author (and father of four little ones) who's been fascinated by this topic of trust for six years. Not a single book to show for it! Just reading, reading, reading. Trying to reorient myself in the machine, I guess. Wondering if I'm just a negative nelly on the topic -- or if there are larger scale trends at work that I can possibly gird against. Currently reading THE AGE OF SURVEILLANCE CAPITALISM by Shoshana Zuboff which is wonderful. Also got THE COMMON GOOD by Robert Reich and TEAM HUMAN by Douglas Rushkoff in the pile. Really admire your work and your working-in-publicness. Keep up the great work!

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Neil! That is not light reading. All great books though. If you've not read his book, I go back to Jonathan Haidt's work.

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hi Rachel, got reference to this substack from Substack newsletter as a featured substack, and I am delighted that I explored it further, full of pragmatic widsom on trust and overall in a common sense of way which is not so common or clear unless someone reads the way you present it. Love your insights and recommendations. Thanks a lot for the writing !!

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Thanks Prashant! Welcome to Rethink community. All suggestions on topics you'd love me to explore are always appreciated. I love writing Rethink :)

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HI Rachel how are you? I thoroughly enjoy rethinkers - it's so much better than overthinker - I've always been a fan and have enjoyed seeing you progress in your endeavours - it's seems a long way from that office in Mosman when we would meet with you and sometimes Jack. I have left the speakers business of Saxton - 2024 is my year off (gap year??) I am reading lots - writing - pilates addict - working two days a week in a cupcake shop - spent the month of February in a camper van travelling around Tasmania - in August we travel to Europe - Paris - Barcelona - Portugal - Austria - Dolomites - Sicily - then a wedding in New York - back in Sydney late November - I hope you and your family are really well - warmest Carol Pedersen

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Carol! It's so lovely to hear from you. I have such a distinct memory of bringing Jack in as a baby ( and not such fond memories of taking him on long haul flights) He's almost 13 and is taller than me now :)

How brilliant to take a gap year and I love that you're working in a cupcake shop. What a trip you have a head of you. Pls keep in touch.

Warmly,

Rachel

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After following your posts for some time on LinkedIn, looking for continued inspiration and insights through your well articulated contributions. Food for thought, starting point for further exploring, digging deeper, gain additional perspectives, and share this with those to whom it might be of interest.

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Having been following your posts for a while on LinkedIn, since you started publishing through Substack missed several contributions. Looking forward to more food for thought & inspiration, for my own sake, and for new perspectives to share with my followers, friends and people I serve as mentor, coach or speaker.

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Welcome Tobias! Looking forward to your insights and perspectives.

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Hi Rachel, I lead a firm called Artefact that does user experience research and design and I have been trying to unpack the concept of trustworthy AI to help my clients (tech firms) create more responsible systems. I love your work (especially the visuals!!). An outstanding question I have is related to trust and transparency. In an interview you said "There is the belief that you can increase trust through transparency. This is a big misconception. You can reduce the need for trust through transparency and through risk controls. Or you can increase people's confidence in the unknown." This led me to think about how guardrails can bring the unknown closer to the known (for example, an autonomous vehicle is programmed to go below 30 mph in residential areas and no higher) so the trust gap is smaller. But it seems like you talk about confidence as being another lever. So then in this case, intentional transparency can increase confidence. An example is the car communicating to the passenger that it sees construction workers up ahead. This helps the passenger BELIEVE in the competence of the AI system and therefore the system EARNS the trust of the passenger. Similarly, transparency can help with reliability (AI reveals its historical accuracy rates), integrity (the AI explains what outcomes it is programmed to achieve - of course here I am talking about traditional AI not genAI), and empathy (an AI ed tech solution describes how it "cares" about the students learning, not just giving answers). And while transparency itself isn't sufficient to lower the need for trust (if the AI says I am right 50% of the time, while transparent, this might increase my trust gap!), it can help when supported by systems that are high on the trust traits. My confusion is in the terminology, especially, when I am trying to draw a graph with uncertainty on the y axis and confidence on the x axis. Are they two different levers? Or is somehow transparency another way to move the unknown closer to the known? Because even though the car AI can communicate it sees construction up ahead, the risk of whether the car will avoid the workers is still there, so the unknown is still fixed. But something has changed by the car communicating to me. So that leads me to think the trust traits have a different effect than affecting the unknown... Also happy to take this conversation to different medium. My linkedin profile is here: https://www.linkedin.com/in/neeti-sanyal/

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Dear Rachel,

I am reaching out because we share a similar mission to make (customer) trust a matter of management. I wonder if there is a chance to join forces?

Five years ago I sold my customer experience consultancy in Berlin to focus on what I believe has a much deeper impact in business than customer experience: customer trust. Based on current knowledge on how we humans surf uncertainty and Niklas Luhmann‘s universal definition of trust as “confidence in one’s expectations,” I developed a data based methodology I call Trust by Design including a pattern library for best practices in fostering customer trust. In parallel I work on the skeleton of a book, working title, The Trust Proposition.

I follow your work for years now and would be extremely happy and thankful if we could have a conversation to discuss potential areas of collaboration.

With greetings from Berlin

Ron

What I can offer

⁃ C-Level Management Consulting (Busines innovation, Marketing, Digital Transformation, CX Design)

⁃ Proven methodology „Trust by Design“

⁃ Entrepreneurial spirit, a curious and empathetic mind

What I seek

⁃ Peer feedback and collaboration

⁃ Opportunities to share the knowledge and spark further enhancements and research of customer trust management

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Hi, I was referred by Nola Simon originally and have been a free subscriber for a while and have enjoyed it. That and the realization that all my paid subscriptions were male writers, pushed me over the edge to pay for a subscription.

What I do is teach Sensemaking and Mindshifting, primarily to educators.

Schools spend a great deal of time teaching how to use technology, but none really learning how to effectively deploy the most powerful technology every created, our minds. Each human mind is more powerful than all the computers in the world. Yet we just accept that when we get anxious we should fight, flee, or freeze, that when we get an idea it's the one right answer, that when others disagree with us we should defeat them, and that we have to win while others lose in order to be successful, as the predominant interpretation of survival of the fittest.

But what if we learned that a degree of anxiousness is actually a motivator to try something new, what if we went into situations aware that not all problems have known solutions, or that perhaps any of a dozen possible solutions could work, or that when people disagree or oppose us we can learn from them and come up with something even better, or that instead of winner take all we could be more concerned as a roles of as the current stewards of the world bridging past generations with future ones?

Those are the skills I want to see developed in the next generation, which I'm teaching in mindshifting classes and games https://docs.google.com/document/d/1fOoW82xDyCExOsV7crmW-M5OASyrU1qSO6jK0XYjo90/edit?usp=sharing

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Hi Rachel. In the process of writing an article for one of the UK medical defence associations and I came across your TED talk(s), your thinking complements that of my usual "go to" on Trust the wonderful Onara O'Neill. Just ordered one of your books and look forward to reading more. I'm an ex-clinical dentist who now works with Dentists and their teams as a coach, encourager and supporter.

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Welcome Alun! I'm also a big O'Neil fan. Let me know if you need any other trust go to's.

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Hi I am Leslie-Ann Giovnilli, a business owner in the financial market, developing my succession plans to give as much of my life/professional learning to our young professionals as I can whilst looking for more time outside of my work. I have ASD and it was only the last year or so, thanks to the Autism Society, that I got real engagement with the hidden issues here; which is also why Rachel your latest 'I'm a fraud' rang such a bell for me. I am not 'erratic' or 'bad tempered' but widely interested in many things and I am just faster at grasping/doing things than many, which is why I get frustrated! Three cheers for the whole Re-thinking concept.

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Thanks Leslie-Ann and welcome! Have you listened to this incredible episode with the writer Kathryn May on autism? https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/why-so-many-women-dont-know-they-are-autistic-with/id1564530722?i=1000617648736

I also loved this episode with Dr Temple Grandin, a trail blazer on autism research and how impacts the way we process information.

https://podcasts.apple.com/gb/podcast/best-of-design-matters-dr-temple-grandin/id328074695?i=1000617542793

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Rachel, thank you and I will try to listen, but one of my ASD issues is my difficulty to listen without seeing the speaker. Audio books are great at getting me to sleep on planes etc. It is a bit of a problem as my clients are asking for more of this medium...

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Hi Rachel. I've been a fan of your work on trust for a while. I came to see you deliver a keynote at Nesta in 2017/2018 and remember your story about your daughter, Alexa and blueberries. I really enjoyed 'Who Do You Trust'. Today I run a boutique future of work advisory firm. Much of our work involves educating business leaders on the forces driving change in the way we work and helping co-design new approaches to the way we think about organisational culture. As you'd imagine, much of the conversation focuses on trust, and more precisely trust in the distributed age. I've been receiving your newsletter for 5-6 months and really appreciate your lines of enquiry. I look forward to learning more.

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Welcome Cathryn! Ah the Alexa story. You have a good memory :)

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Hi all, I'm writing a book, ostensibly on "How Do We Establish Truth?", but particularly in our never-been-more-divided society, with a strong message of "We need to LISTEN to one another, because very few of us are the 'Truth-Experts' we think we are". One of many 'sub-processes' in establishing truth in many circumstances, is the process of establishing 'who can we trust' when we are perceiving a variety of reports and due to circumstances we cannot directly establish the truth of a matter with, for example, our own 5 physical senses. Clearly a work like this requires a lot of research and input from sources who at least most people believe they can... you guessed it... trust! That's why I'm here...

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Welcome Ian! If you’d like any recommendations on ‘truth’ and trust related books let me know :)

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Hello Rachel! Thank you for providing the opportunity to connect as we have much in common!! I am located in Portland, Oregon (my parents were from England), come from the tech industry and have a technology strategist and practitioner's perspective. I am best known for starting Intel's efforts in automated driving which led to the $15.3B acquisition of Mobileye and now generates almost $2B in revenue. My career focus is on the future of humans and autonomous systems and I have worked on automated factories, the digital home, the autonomous data center, and the autonomous aerial revolution (delivery drones, flying taxis, aerial ride sharing, and overhauling the world's air traffic control systems). I retired from Intel in early 2020 and have been working on the IEEE standards for governing AI and writing a series of nonfiction books about the future of humans and autonomous systems to make the future "more cool" and "less creepy." My first book is about Creating Trustworthy Technology. Our work is highly complementary and we have similar thought processes and approaches, including use of illustrations to convey complex concepts. I would be thrilled to connect via LinkedIn https://www.linkedin.com/in/helen-gould-41910/ and to chat with you. Wendell Wallach also suggested I contact you after seeing a sample of my work. All the very best, Helen A. F. Gould

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Wow, your work sounds fascinating Helen. Can't wait to hear some of your thoughts on future ideas.

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Feb 2, 2023Liked by Rachel Botsman

Thank you Rachel! Your work is amazing as well. I read "Who Can You Trust" after I had written most of my book proposal and was absolutely thrilled to find another like minded person who sees "trust" in a similar way.

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I sent you a LinkedIn invitation to connect so we can follow up to arrange a chat.

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Hello all, my name is Jeffrey. I am a son, brother, husband, father, dog-papa and thinker who creates designs which rehabilitate buildings and creates totally new ones. I have a very strong sensory memory which enables me to create or recreate environments to augment the human experience. My marketing brain made me say that, I apologize.

I grew up in the Midwest of the United States and would storm chase toward thunderstorms marching across the wide open plains, lay on the hood of my car and be bombarded by the first sheets of rain. I graduated from college as a History major and spent a semester in Jerusalem, an historic monolith. Upon graduation, a friend and I traveled Europe exploring, many things, but for me Architecture. My wife is a sensitive soul who is a dog groomer by trade, and a backpacker. My hobby is car restoration, I have a nice and running Triumph Spitfire and a not so nice and not running Triumph TR7. But enough about me, I'd like to hear from more of you.

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Fascinated by people with strong spacial apathy and a strong sensory memory.

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Do you mean spatial/spacial empathy? I actually like the British spelling better. To clarify, the sensory memory I'm talking about is haptic, aural and olfactory senses that can be remembered and brought forward to one's imagination at will, kind of like an actor.

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I meant spatial empathy :) not a British sp but a Rachelism.

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Spatial apathy has me seeing people run into walls as in slapstick. Turning small errors into funny stories..

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Welcome Josh! Adam is a friend and I also love Think Again. Check out his new book on Hidden Potential. You might also enjoy Being Wrong by Kathryn Schulz. Yes, I’m a walking book recommendation engine...:)

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